We’re number … 2

We’re number … 2

It’s time again for the once-every-so-often ranking of NGOs, and we’re proud to announce that BRAC has again placed near the top. “The agile giant of the development world,” in the words of Global Geneva, BRAC has been ranked number two out of 500 NGOs in the world. Now – I know what you’re thinking.
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Mobile money needs the support of grassroots organisations to reach its potential

Mobile money needs the support of grassroots organisations to reach its potential

Last Thursday, the 2015 Gates letter  identified mobile money as a transformative innovation for the next 15 years, driving faster improvement of the lives of people in poor countries than has ever been seen. Those who are familiar with Bangladesh will not be surprised that bKash was profiled as one of the most exciting ecosystems
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“Where’s My School Roof?”

“Where’s My School Roof?”

This post originally appeared on the blog of the World Justice Project. The World Justice Project is an institutional partner of the Namati Justice Prize along with BRAC and the UN Development Programme. The Namati Justice Prize was created to shine a light on the ways people find to secure justice. This post also appeared on the
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Winter Relief

Winter Relief

This winter, BRAC reached out to distribute over 100,000 blankets and warm clothes all over Bangladesh. Lives are lost every year in the country due to the cold spell that affects the poor and homeless who cannot afford warm clothing and appropriate housing. The Give Warmth This Winter campaign was launched in December 2014 with
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When the simplest of solutions can be the most effective

When the simplest of solutions can be the most effective

There is a lot of room for innovation when it comes to health. In a resource-poor country like Bangladesh, effective and low-cost preventive and basic curative interventions can save millions of lives. If they are rooted in community demand and context, they can be implemented at a great scale. For instance, BRAC’s frontline health workers
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Yes, hygiene and school enrolment are directly proportional

Yes, hygiene and school enrolment are directly proportional

“A study undertaken in Bangladesh revealed an 11 per cent increase in girls’ enrolment mainly due to the provision of sanitary toilets.” -Technical paper series/IRC In Bangladesh the standard number of toilets in schools has been set as a minimum of one toilet for every 60 students. However, this is far from being achieved. The
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Building future leaders

“As long as I have these two hands, I will continue to write,” says Lunkuse Betty Ssekirevu. “I want to write stories of Africa, and share the narratives that are yet to be told.” Betty lives in a village in Uganda along with her mother and her siblings. Awarded with a scholarship from The MasterCard Foundation
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Meet a woman who is redefining gender roles

Meet a woman who is redefining gender roles

When you meet Fatema, ‘transvestite’ is not the word that immediately comes to mind.But that is how she is referred to by colleagues and strangers alike. She prefers to wear shirts instead of covering herself with a dupatta (scarf) and wears her hair short.In Bangladesh her behaviour goes beyond most peoples’ social expectations regarding gender.
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More Than Credit: Can microfinance also deliver affordable health care?

More Than Credit: Can microfinance also deliver affordable health care?

Originally posted on Next Billion blog on 22 December 2014. In Bangladesh, 65 percent of health expenditures are out-of-pocket payments. This lack of funded health care puts considerable pressure on the millions of people with debt from microloans. For many, a health emergency means much more than paying loan installments late; it can mean liquidating business assets
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A new beginning

A new beginning

“Since the collapse, I am too afraid to go back inside a garments factory,” said Ankhi, who used to work in Rana Plaza along with her husband. Although she survived, her husband’s body was never found. Left to provide for their daughter on her own, she had to find another means to survive. To help
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