WASH

December 8, 2015

Breaking bad – How to make good habits stick

Recently I visited Manikganj in rural Bangladesh to see BRAC’s work in water and sanitation.  A shopkeeper at a local market said that he knew handwashing was important, but soap was expensive.  “What’s more expensive,” I asked, “soap or the medicines for treating diarrhea and fever?”  “Medicine,” he said.  He knew the answer - but that didn’t change his actions.
August 3, 2015

Voices of success in BRAC WASH communities

“People are developing a taste for healthy living. They want improvement‑ compared to us and what we are doing, they want better,” says Md Amin Uddin, one of the elders in Arua village in Keshabpur upazila, Jessore, Bangladesh who is optimistic about the future.
March 29, 2015

Lessons in revolutionising drinking water systems in saline areas

Sutarkhali is located in Khulna, next to the mangrove forests of Sundarbans. Climate change in this southern region has seen cyclones with more damaging effects. The sea level is rising, and loss of land through erosion and saltwater intrusion makes it hard to find safe drinking water. There are 40 million people living in the coastal belt of Bangladesh who rely on natural water sources to sustain their livelihoods and daily needs.
January 8, 2015

Yes, hygiene and school enrolment are directly proportional

“A study undertaken in Bangladesh revealed an 11 per cent increase in girls’ enrolment mainly due to the provision of sanitary toilets.” -Technical paper series/IRC, In Bangladesh the standard number of toilets in schools has been set as a minimum of one toilet for every 60 students. However, this is far from being achieved. The infographic below shows that on average, schools in Bangladesh have half the number of toilets required. However, although 94 per cent of schools have latrines within the compound, a large number remain unusable because they are dirty or broken.
August 3, 2014

The Bangladesh Paradox: exceptional health and sanitation advances despite poverty

This article was originally posted on IRC WASH blog on 1 August 2014 by Cor Dietvorst and Vera van der Grift Dr. Mushtaque Chowdhury from BRAC on the Bangladesh public health miracle, aid or trade, arsenic, floating latrines and the post-2015 development agenda.
July 26, 2014

Talk dirty: 12 things you probably don’t know about hygiene

For students who are not taught proper hygiene at home, health education can greatly influence their lives. In many countries, comprehensive hygiene education is government-mandated. In Bangladesh, it is not. BRAC’s water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programme works in schools to compensate for this.
May 25, 2014

The tea-time message for men is hot and strong – but first wash your hands!

IRC and the BRAC WASH programme's efforts in reaching out to men through the tea stall approach as informal meeting spaces for men to talk about hygiene in Bangladesh.
March 27, 2014

Closing the sanitation gap

When I visit communities for the BRAC Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programme, I am met with examples of both good and bad practices. One can draw inspiration from the many success stories while also taking into account the many obstacles that some families have to continually deal with.
December 8, 2013

The business of turning faecal waste into energy

The BRAC Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programme in Bangladesh is  planning to convert faecal matter from pit latrines into commercially viable fertiliser, biogas and electricity. The aim is to complete the sanitation chain by making material from millions of pit latrines safe and economically productive. Babar Kabir, senior director of the BRAC WASH programme, says that there is a sound business case for investment in bio-energy units that could generate electricity on a large scale.
November 19, 2013

BRAC celebrates World Toilet Day 2013

Watch this short video and learn how you can help support universal access to better sanitation and improved personal hygiene through the work of the poor themselves!
October 28, 2013

The role of WASH in scaling up nutrition in Bangladesh

The 2011 Lancet series says that about 2.6 billion people lack access to proper toilet facilities and about 980 million young people under 18 live in homes without basic sanitation. Moreover, research has shown that unimproved hygiene, inadequate sanitation, and insufficient and unsafe drinking water account for about seven per cent of the total disease burden and 19 per cent of child mortality worldwide.
September 12, 2013

Boroitoli: A strange picture of sanitation

I would like to share the peculiar sanitation situation in Boroitoli, a hilly village in an extremely hard-to-reach area of Fatikchari sub-district of Chittagong, Bangladesh. We visited this village earlier this year to observe the existing conditions of water, sanitation and hygiene.