Health

May 6, 2018
BLOG Health

International Midwives Day 2018: Midwives leading the way with quality care

Bangladesh is on a drive to train more midwives, a step seen as critical to reducing the maternal mortality rate. The country’s ratio of home deliveries vastly outnumber births at health facilities. In rural areas, it’s estimated only 20% of women give birth with a skilled birth attendant present. On International Day Of The Midwife, we honour women who are saving lives.
April 26, 2018
BLOG Health

How to eliminate malaria: At the last mile in Bangladesh

Mosquito bites are unpleasant for everyone. Most of the time, we simply shrug them off as a brief feeling of discomfort though. That is not the case for many people around the globe though, such as the 216 million people affected by malaria, a preventable disease that claimed the lives of nearly 445,000 people in 2015 alone.
April 11, 2018

How do you confront taboos in a humanitarian crisis?

Contrary to popular belief, Noor had a clear understanding of what family planning is, and her husband was supportive of it - she had delivered her daughter with the help of a midwife at that very same health facility. She was encouraged to have her child here by a Rohingya traditional birth attendant– a volunteer in BRAC’s health team.
February 7, 2018
BLOG Health

The sweet, miracle food that is fighting malnutrition in Uganda

A large number of Ugandan women and children were consuming insufficient amounts of vitamin-A. The prevalence of vitamin-A deficiency and xerophthalmia in Uganda stands at 2.52% and 5.4% respectively, though it is estimated that about 50% children consume insufficient amounts of vitamin-A.
January 23, 2018

Over 9,000 “dignity kits” distributed. What even are they and why are they important?

A woman’s handbag seemingly contains a world of mystery. Her phone, keys, wallet, some tissue to wipe the nose, a sanitary pad just in case, maybe sunglasses, and receipts from the supermarket. But what does one carry in a crisis?
November 26, 2017

What do safe spaces in a humanitarian crisis look like?

Deep inside the chaotic makeshift settlements of Kutupalong, Cox’s Bazar, is a spacious, shaded, colourful place. A bamboo structure with handmade decorations hanging from the walls. Curious onlookers gather outside the thatched windows, attracted by the rhythm.
November 19, 2017

Making our roads safer: World day for road traffic victims

The UN World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, pursuant to General Assembly resolution 60/5, observed every third Sunday in November, is a major advocacy day for road traffic injury prevention.
October 17, 2017

Bangladesh completes world’s second largest cholera vaccination campaign

Over 582,000 people from the Rakhine State of Myanmar have crossed into Bangladesh since August 25th. They are living in extremely cramped, extremely unhygienic conditions, and more people are arriving every day.
October 11, 2017

Averting a mass health crisis at Bangladesh’s most popular holiday destination

Cox’s Bazar is the world’s longest sea beach, and littered with holidaymakers and colourful beach umbrellas throughout the year. Less than an hour’s drive from the string of shiny hotels, however now lies a mega city of black tarp tents.
September 15, 2017
BLOG Health

The doctor without a degree saving hundreds of lives in Bangladesh

It is 5:30am in Kaliyakoir, Gazipur, and Nilufar Yasmin’s patients are waiting already outside, lined up beside a sign that says ‘BRAC Shasthya Shebika’. They are farmers and shopkeepers, and they have come to ‘Doctor Apa’ to get their daily dose of tuberculosis medicine before heading to work.
February 22, 2017

The 202 billion dollars we cannot see

It is estimated that 624 million people around the world could have their vision restored if they could access eye glasses. This lack of access is costing the global economy a whopping USD 202 billion per year.
December 9, 2015

With Ebola gone, Sierra Leone must now rebuild rural livelihoods

Sierra Leoneans celebrated in the streets last month when 42 days passed without a single new case of Ebola. The mix of mourning and jubilation called to mind the signing of a peace treaty after a war, and the end of Ebola should indeed be greeted as a victory.